>Any Jew worth his horns knows that "L'Chaim" means "to life." Anyone who has seen Fiddler on the Roof may remember the fine song sung to celebrate when Tevye agrees that his daughter Tzeitel, who is maybe in her late teens or early 20s, will marry Lazar Wolf, the lecherous old shtetl (that's ghetto) butcher who ogles Tzeitel like a choice cut of kosher meat every time the poor girl has to go to his shop. Tevye thinks that this is a good arrangement for Tzeitel, since his family is mired in poverty and the widowed butcher is rich, so she'll be comfortable in life. (And one can always hope that the old fuck will die quickly and just leave her with the money, a la Anna Nicole Smith, but I don't know that this actually crossed Tevye's mind.)

The point is, there's a big song called "L'Chaim" that celebrates life. I was thinking about this last night (and now can't get the damn song out of my head) because sundown marks Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, 5768. Traditionally, apples and honey are eaten at the start of the New Year in hopes of it being a sweet year. Last night, Husband compared Jewish pussy to this custom, saying that he likes to dip his apple in the honey, then laughing sleazily. (Update clarification: because it was a funny joke! He's not creepy!) I'll never be able to think about a sweet New Year the same way again. Ah, I adore him.

L'chaim and shana tova.

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